HOW TO MAKE WORKING FROM HOME WORK FOR YOU, AND YOUR HOME

WORKING FROM HOME, THE NEW NORMAL HAS FORCED MY HOME SPACE TO MORPH INTO MY OFFICE SPACE TOO AND LIKE SO MANY OTHERS I’VE HAD TO ADAPT UNDER LOCKDOWN AND LEARN TO MAKE IT WORK. WHICH IS NOT AS EASY AS IT SOUNDS!

By Greer Krige, Lifestyle Content Creator

There are so many distractions and you need to be seriously self-disciplined. There is no sleeping in, catching up on a series or knocking off early (too often) for a glass of wine. So what I mean here is, you have to really dig deep for self-discipline.

As such, the home space has evolved accordingly. New home-office spaces have been created, often in rooms that have already been allocated to another purpose such as a guest bedroom or dining room.

Nowadays, especially with the size of houses and budgets, it makes less sense to have a space dedicated to a single purpose and more sense to have spaces with multi-functional use throughout the day or week.

Open spaces are now being separated at times with the use of screens and stacking doors making these spaces temporarily closed off for privacy and then opened again when not in use, creating flexibility.

Clever positioning of workspaces has been seen with unused space such as placing a desk in the empty section under the stairs or enclosing the patio or balcony using stacking glass doors to create an office.

It’s not only the spaces that are being shifted and interchangeable. Semi-permanent rooms call for flexible, multi-use and transforming furniture.

Creative, space-saving storage solutions are becoming increasingly popular resulting in spaces that can be used as work stations, child friendly play rooms and then our regular homes as we used to know them, essentially with the rise of ‘adaptable design.’ 

Some examples that I love:

  • A desk that extends into a dining room table
  • Desks that are portable or fold away into a cabinet or wall space
  • Standing desks (better for concentration apparently) that can be stowed neatly away when not in use.
  • The Sleeper couch. A couch by day and bed at night for the second bedroom that needs to be a consulting space. 
  • Wall beds that fold away when not in use.
  • Seating with built in storage, especially at a banquette or bay window.
  • Shelving that makes use of wall space to clear up the floor. 
  • Install a corner desk from a floating shelf, it’s more compact.
  • A built-in cabinet with a slide out desk surface.

Essentials for your home office:

  • Good Wifi connection (I cannot emphasize this enough)
  • Noise cancelling earphones, the building industry didn’t seem to have lockdown like the rest of us
  • Ergonomic chair- no one needs backache
  • Position the desk perpendicular to the window- this will reduce glare and save your eyes
  • Remove distractions from the space – no TV (bye-bye Queen’s Gambit)
  • Remember to pace yourself and take regular breaks
  • Good lighting, ideally natural 
  • Make the space homely and tranquil- add art and plants (plants help aid concentration and create a nice backdrop for online meetings)
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